FREE C-CARDS…

Texting back and forth with a diver who’s signed up for some training sessions with me (he’s taking a Helitrox Deco class this spring), I was explaining which elements of his program are covered by my fees. And of course in that list of items, there was no mention of the c-cards that graduates get if they pass the course (with TDI this program comprises Advanced Nitrox and Helitrox Decompression Procedures, so two c-cards).

“How much for the cards?” He asked.

“Nothing,” I wrote. “The cards are free… you earn ’em. You can’t buy them!”

He texted back that he liked that idea. “Different to some other scuba classes I’ve taken,” he said.

This got me thinking about why, when I started to teach technical programs, I adopted the policy of “Giving Free C-Cards” to successful course graduates.

Students rarely fail the programs I offer. However, it’s not unusual for a student to have some challenges and have to do a few extra dives or work on their own for a while to grasp a concept that initially is hard to grasp… but an out-and-out fail is unusual.

Sometimes though, it happens. A student has a complete disregard for their teammates, they run out of gas repeatedly, they are simply not ready for “this type” of diving or do not have the required controls over body and mind in the water to be a technical diving. Usually, they accept my advice. Once or twice I’ve run into problems.

The one that made me very glad that I had adopted and advertized the policy that, “Your Card(s) are FREE!” took it really bad and reported me to the training department of the agency underwriting the course (which happened to be TDI).

In addition to the professional complaint, she had threatened a suit through small claims court under the assumption that her course fees included payment for c-cards. She was demanding at least that portion of the money she had paid, back. Her position was that she had paid for the course and expected to get her cards at the end of it.

Odd, don’t you think?

Anyhow, if you teach (tech or sport programs), here’s a suggestion if you do not so so already. Make it clear to your students that C-Cards are FREE, and that students earn them rather than buy them.

So, you travel with a rebreather do you?

I find myself traveling with a CCR more often than not these days, and most of the time, at least part of my journey entails airports and airport security. Surprisingly, I have few horror tales to share with you; in fact, just the opposite. I have found that with a little preparation and politeness — and leaving a few extra minutes between arriving at the terminal and my departure — things usually go very smoothly.

Let’s talk about the preparation part of the equation for a moment. Several years ago, Jill Heinerth mentioned to me that she put a note in with any rebreather kit she was carrying specifically explaining what the heck it was to security staff. I borrowed her idea.

The wording and the logos on the “letterhead” of the printed document I carry has changed a little over the years, but regardless, it always seems to work wonders. Here, for the record, is what my ‘official CCR travel document’ says.

NOTICE TO BORDER / AIRPORT SECURITY PERSONNEL

This apparatus is a Closed-Circuit Rebreather (CCR) diver life-support system and may be safely transported as cargo, checked, or carry-on baggage. The components of this CCR system consist of a scrubber head (containing a series of gas sensors and display handset powered by an encased standard user-replaceable battery); scrubber body (containing top and bottom screens, end-caps and a feed or deflection pipe); breathing loop (containing breathing hoses, Open_circuit Bailout valve (BOV), and counter-lungs); and two scuba regulator first stages each fitted with an array of low and high-pressure hoses. Additional open-circuit scuba equipment may also be carried with this CCR life-support system.

NONE of these components offers a threat to the security and safety of inspection personnel, other passengers, carrier vessels, buildings or other property, and all components conform to NOAA (National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration) and WRSTC (World Recreational Scuba Training Council) recreational scuba equipment guidelines for transportation by commercial carriers.

The individual transporting this equipment should be able to show proof of certification in its use and will be willing to explain its function to any security personnel upon request.

PLEASE NOTE: Any pressure vessels (scuba cylinders) accompanying this CCR life-support system MUST be dismantled and have valves REMOVED in such a way that visual inspection of the vessel’s interior is facilitated (as per TSA/FAA ruling). Failure to conform to this stipulation voids this document.

You may find that printing this out and putting it in your baggage with your rebreather helpful.