Questions to ask – and answers to expect – when you research which CCR is right for you…


Let’s take as given that your research so far has turned up that the type of diver you are, and the type of diving you like to do – now or in the near future – makes you a good candidate to invest in a closed-circuit rebreather.

 

So far, so good, but now you need to pick which type of rebreather is going to be the best investment. You can find plenty of help on that score… almost every CCR diver thinks his or her unit is the best around, and in a way, that can hardly be surprising since they’ve invested a lot of money and time into it. And admitting you made a mistake of that magnitude is tough for anyone to admit to.

 

The decision-making process WILL be easier for you if you can log a few hours on various units BEFORE making any final commitment. And the rather worn out advice that it is not the agency that counts but the instructor is actually very true with CCR training, so picking the instructor can be as important as picking a unit.

 

But all that said and done, there are some fundamental questions that you should be armed with before you hand over the admission fees to diving without bubbles. The list below contains a few that I think are important. Look them over. I hope they help. Let me know what you think.

 

Is the CCR you are considering CE approved? It should be because CE approval connotes rigorous third-party testing for important performance issues such as work of breathing and overall functionality.

 

What is the tested depth rating? Some manufacturers put a depth limit on their gear and diving deeper than the depth recommended in the user manual is simply a poor judgment call.

 

Does the CCR you’re looking at have Over the Shoulder (Front) or Rear Mounted Counterlung design? There really isn’t a great deal of difference between the two, but there are advantages to each. As far as I know, only one manufacturer offers divers the choice with BOTH options with both carrying CE Certification.

 

What type of Oxygen Injection System, is used in the CCR you are looking at? Options include a Constant Flow Orifice, diver adjustable Variable Flow Orifice, a Static Solenoid or a Dynamic Solenoid. If you are looking for a CCR with the option of automatic set-point control, look for one with a Dynamic Solenoid capable of delivering continuous and instant reaction to changes in oxygen partial pressure in the diving loop.

 

If the unit uses oxygen controllers (has an automatic option) does it have independent dual controllers? It should do otherwise there is no backup in a system that is vital to life support.

 

How well will it maintain constant PO2 during ascent? This really comes back to controllers. During ascent the partial pressure of oxygen in the diver’s breathing loop can drop dramatically and even to hypoxic levels as the ambient pressure drops. Unless the CCR’s oxygen controller has the ability to react correctly and rapidly to these changes, the diver is at serious risk and the unit is poorly designed.

 

Does it have a CO2 Scrubber performance monitor? The scrubber bed is where carbon dioxide is removed from exhaled breath. There are several factors that can have a negative effect on its performance and how effectively it does its job. Since the chemical reaction that takes place in the scrubber material generates heat, a smart way to monitor performance is to measure which portion of the bed is “hot” and display that to the diver.

 

Does it have a CO2 Sensor? By following a few basic “rules” and sticking to certain guidelines, CO2 breakthrough can be avoided, but many divers feel more comfortable and secure with this type of sensor in place. If you’d like one, is it available on the CCR you’re considering?

 

Does it have Heads Up Display (HUD) and what information does it show to the diver? An HUD is a useful tool, but some are confusing and seem less than intuitive. An HUD should convey exactly the information necessary for the diver to fly the unit safely, and this includes warning when PO2 is outside set parameters, when battery power drops, and when the scrubber bed is reaching the end of its effective life.

 

Does it have real-time Nitrox / Trimix Computer designed and manufactured by the same people who built the CCR? It should. Some CCRs use controllers and computers from third-party suppliers. This may suit some risk models and business plans, but this approach is outside my personal comfort level. Of course yours may vary, but I like these two “bits” of my CCR to be integrated. I also think it helps when the Quality Assurance that keeps me safe on the rebreather extends to the computer feeding me information about CCR function and my decompression status.

 

Does the CCR you’re looking at have Automatic Depth Setpoint switching, and can that auto function be overridden simply without lots of button pushing? This is a good feature that can help to manage the risks of decompression stress, among other issues.

 

Does it have audible and visual alarms for crucial issues such as low or high PO2, high CO2, and scrubber life? These items are critically important. I try to dive my unit so that no alarms are triggered, but it’s nice to know there’s a back-up.

 

Are parts and service availability worldwide? If you travel, it would be nice to know that in the event of something breaking, a replacement part is not sitting in a warehouse someplace on the other side of the world and a several days away from access to world-wide shipping.

 

How much service is required? Good industrial design and well made parts put together in an ISO 9001 factory rather than outsourced to the cheapest off-shore knock-off house cannot come close to a 100 percent guarantee that things will work as expected, but they help us to come close.

 

Is there a backup power source? If a machine uses battery power to function, then there should be an independent backup battery pack and a mechanism to switch seamlessly from one to the other should it be required.

 

Can it be upgraded for Technical Trimix Diving? Not all CCR divers are interested in technical diving, but if you one day decide to take up technical diving, ask yourself if will you have to sell your unit and start again with a new model.

 

Does it have PC Interface and Dive log download? This is a nice feature to have at any time, but it becomes amazing when you can send that log to the manufacturer for system diagnostics.

2 thoughts on “Questions to ask – and answers to expect – when you research which CCR is right for you…

  1. Pingback: Soon to join the bubbleless world - Page 2

  2. Pingback: What Rebreather for Me?

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